Red Cross Sound The Alarm Project

Red Cross Sound The Alarm Project

RALEIGH, NC, May 4, 2018 — The American Red Cross asks everyone to help Sound the Alarm in Eastern North Carolina and be part of the nationwide Red Cross effort to help reduce the number of deaths and injuries from home fires

At Sound the Alarm events, hundreds of Red Cross volunteers, along with fire departments, and community supporters will canvass high-risk neighborhoods, install free smoke alarms, replace batteries in existing alarms, provide home fire safety tips and help families create escape plans.

“Home fires happen without warning and are responsible for killing seven people on average every day in the U.S.,” said Barry Porter, regional CEO of the Red Cross in Eastern NC. “ThroughSound the Alarm events we are working hard to teach people about home fire safety and install free smoke alarms.”

The Red Cross responds to nearly 64,000 disasters a year across the country, the majority of which are home fires. Home fires represent a significant threat to our communities, which is why the Red Cross launched the nationwide Home Fire Campaign that aims to reduce home fire deaths and injuries by 25 percent.

Please join this important effort. Together, we can Sound the Alarm about fire safety and help save lives. To sign up to volunteer for Sound the Alarm, or to learn more, visit soundthealarm.org/enc.

Sound the Alarm is made possible thanks to generous financial donations from national partners: Almost Family, Delta Air Lines and International Paper. The Red Cross has also received funding from FEMA through the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program. Local supporters include Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, Circle K, CBS17, Duke Energy, Wells Fargo, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Live Oak Bank, Smithfield, and United Way.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

PHOTO: North Carolina Red Cross volunteers prepare to install smoke alarms in neighborhood homes. Photo by Adam Jennings/American Red Cross. Photo by Adam Jennings/American Red Cross.

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Tobacco Road Marathon Charity Record

Tobacco Road Marathon Charity Record

Cary, NC (April 2, 2018) – CARY, N.C. The board of directors of the Allscripts Tobacco Road Marathon (TRM) and the Feetures! Half Marathon announced today that their 2018 events set a new record of charitable giving at $155,000 – a full $25,000 more than their record-setting year in 2017. The cumulative total now stands at $916,000, putting the organization’s goal of $1,000,000 well within reach in 2019.

In an unprecedented move, the board opened registration for the 2019 event at this year’s Expo on March 16. Runners can register now at the Tobacco Road Marathon Web site and enjoy “Early Bird” pricing for the lowest registration fees. The marathon is the largest in North Carolina and the only one in the Triangle area during the spring. The Half marathon will also be the only race of its kind in the Triangle during spring 2019.

“I am so grateful to all our hundreds of volunteers and runners who make this event possible and enable the support we can give our charities. We could not do it without them and our all-volunteer board,” said Tobacco Road Marathon President and Founder Kazem Yahyapour. “To think that we will reach more than a million dollars in just the tenth running of our races is an achievement of which we are very proud.”

Among the charities receiving contributions from TRM are JDRF, American Red Cross, Hope For The Warriors, Wake County Parks and Recreation, Rex UNC Healthcare Foundation, the V Foundation, Rails to Trails, YMCA, the Food Bank of North Carolina and We Can So You Can.

“Every year I just couldn’t be more impressed with the unselfish dedication of Kazem and the board of directors, as well as the hundreds of volunteers,” said Barry Porter, American Red Cross regional CEO. “I attend many of their evening board meetings and see the workload they take on. There is no paid staff. These individuals volunteer passionately for months to host a great event and then gift the proceeds to needs in our community.”

This year’s marathon overall winner was Carson Truesdale with a time of 2 hours, 28 minutes, 7.983 seconds. The women’s champion was Grace Stadnyk with a time of 2 hours, 59 minutes, 8.03 seconds. The men’s half marathon winner was Benard Ngeno at 1 hour, 8 minutes, 3.047 seconds. Christine Babcock won the women’s half marathon with a time of 1 hour, 15 minutes, 52.317 seconds. Full results for all runners can be found at Finish Strong Series (FSS). A complete list of event sponsors can be found at the Tobacco Road Marathon Web site. About 18 percent of the marathon runners qualified for the Boston Marathon.

The Tobacco Road Marathon Association is a non-profit organization dedicated with its sponsors to providing financial assistance to its partner charities by channeling the passions of the North Carolina Triangle area’s running community into a powerful force for good.

Rucking Division

Rucking Division

For Immediate Release:

 

Contact: Mark Dill, (919) 949-9263

 

MILITARY-STYLE RUCKING DIVISION FOR TOBACCO ROAD HALF MARATHON

2018 Half Marathon To Include Innovative “Rucking” – Walking With Weighted Backpack

Cary, NC (January 23, 2018) – The Tobacco Road Marathon is pleased to announce the addition of a rucking division for this year’s half-marathon that is open to all who wish to walk or run the course with a weighted rucksack.

The addition of the rucking division to the March 18th race in Cary, NC, is the result of a partnership with The Ruckership Network and is in keeping with the Tobacco Road Marathon’s historic focus as a community-based, volunteer-led race.

“The growth of interest in rucking and all its related activities made it a logical addition to our race offerings,” said Tobacco Road Marathon president Kazem Yahyapour. “There’s a lot of community engagement in rucking through groups like F3 Nation, Females in Action and Team RWB, and this division becomes a way to involve a new group of athletes in a race that is all about the Triangle community.”

Rucking, or walking with a weighted backpack, is familiar to many people with a background in military service, as it’s a key component of training for infantry soldiers who must transport heavy loads of gear across carried terrain by foot.

The activity has crossed over into the civilian population in recent years and has become a popular form of low-impact training that builds cardiovascular fitness and strength. Participants ruck socially, as part of service projects or train for events like those offered by GORUCK through its series of endurance challenges – drawing together people interested in fitness, service and support for the military formed the Ruckership Network in 2017 to serve and expand the rucking community.

“We’re fired up to work with the Tobacco Road Marathon folks to bring a rucking division to their half-marathon,” said Ruckership Network co-founder Tim Whitmire, who is also co-founder of the F3 Nation network of free men’s workout groups. “We’ve seen the amazing fellowship effect that ruck training has on participants and are excited to give Triangle-area ruckers another reason to strap on their rucks in 2018.”

For participants who want to ruck with a certified weight (30 pounds for men over 150 pounds, 20 for those under that standard; 20 pounds for women over 150 pounds, 10 pounds for those under) a team will be on hand at the start are to weigh and certify rucks before the start of the event. In addition to the half-marathon finisher’s medal, ruckers crossing the finish line will also receive a traditional 2×3-inch morale patch to mark their achievement.

Ruck division participants are free to move at whatever pace they like during the event (“ruck running” isn’t particularly recommended, but some people do it.) A popular target pace is 15:00 per mile, which is a fast walk for many.

To learn more about rucking and for help connecting to a ruck training group in the Triangle area, please contact one of the following groups: F3 Nation (men only): ruck@f3nation.com; Females in Action (women only): fianationrucks@gmail.com; Team Red, White, and Blue (co-ed): raleigh@teamrwb.org.

The Tobacco Road Marathon Association is a non-profit organization dedicated with its sponsors to providing financial assistance to its partner charities by channeling the passions of the North Carolina Triangle area’s running community into a powerful force for good.

The Ruckership Network’s mission is to grow and serve the rucking community as a gathering place for all people motivated by fitness, service, and support for members of the military. The group’s credo is “Ruck Hard for a Better World!”

Red Cross Good Works Across America

Red Cross Good Works Across America

Across U.S., Red Cross Responds to Nearly 60% More Home Fires in First Days of 2018 Than in Same Period in 2017

RALEIGH, Jan. 26, 2018 — In the first nine days of the new year, the American Red Cross responded to nearly 60 percent more home fires than that same period in 2017.

Red Cross volunteers across the country have already responded to 3,150 home fires in the first nine days of the year, compared to 2,003 fires in the same time period of 2017. This can be attributed to the recent string of dangerously cold days, as colder temperatures are often linked to a rise in home fires. Heating, holiday decorations, winter storms and candles all contribute to an increased risk of fire during the winter months, according to the National Fire Protection Association and the U.S. Fire Administration.

The Eastern North Carolina Region of the Red Cross (53 counties) responded to home and apartment fires that displaced 267 families from Dec. 23, 2017- Jan. 23, 2018. That’s nearly nine families every day who were left suddenly in the cold and snow.  In that one-month timeframe, the Red Cross helped 735 individuals with basic needs and a warm, safe place to stay as they began to piece their lives back together.

“Each of these home fires is devastating for the people involved and we have recently seen a dramatic increase in the number of deaths and injuries,” said Barry Porter, regional CEO of the Red Cross in Eastern NC. “Before our next cold snap, we can’t urge the public enough to make sure they have working smoke alarms, which Red Cross can provide for free if needed, and make sure their families have a planned escape route should they experience a fire.”

SAFETY TIPS TO HELP PREVENT HOME FIRES:

The Red Cross is asking every household in Eastern NC to take steps that can help save lives.

  • Keep all potential sources of fuel – paper, clothing, bedding, curtains or rugs – at least three feet away from sources of heat.
  • Never leave portable heaters and fireplaces unattended.
  • Place space heaters on a level, hard and nonflammable surface. Keep children and pets away from space heaters. Look for models that shut off automatically if the heater falls over.
  • Never use a cooking range or oven to heat your home.
  • Keep fire in your fireplace by using a glass or metal fire screen.

NATIONAL HOME FIRE CAMPAIGN SAVES 332 LIVES The Red Cross responds to as many as 64,000 disasters every year and most of these are home fires. Sadly, seven times a day someone in this country dies in a home fire.

To combat these statistics, the Red Cross launched its Home Fire Campaign in 2014, focusing on installing free smoke alarms in neighborhoods at high risk for fires and teaching people about fire safety. Since the start of the campaign, the Red Cross and partners have installed more than 1 million smoke alarms and helped to save 332 lives.

NEED A SMOKE ALARM?

The Red Cross provides free smoke alarm installations. To request a free alarm, call your local Red Cross office, or visit www.soundthealarm.org/enc and fill out a request form.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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The V Foundation, Robin Roberts Announce Robin Roberts Foundation For Cancer Survivorship Research

The V Foundation, Robin Roberts Announce Robin Roberts Foundation For Cancer Survivorship Research

The V Foundation for Cancer Research, a top-rated cancer research charity, is excited to announce a new fund in honor of Robin Roberts, a member of the V Foundation’s Board of Directors and co-anchor of ABC’s “Good Morning America.” An event was held to announce the formation of the Robin Roberts Fund for Cancer Survivorship Research at Blue Smoke in New York City on December 4 to an intimate group of friends and supporters of the V Foundation.

“Cancer survivorship is finally coming to the forefront. While cancer prevention and treatment are critical, helping survivors thrive is equally important,” said Roberts. “I’m thrilled to be part of the V Foundation team in making this happen.”

The event raised more than $150,000 to support translational research to improve the quality of life for oncology patients (adult or pediatric) after treatment. Supported research will include work on patient precision medicine to decrease severe adverse events, research to investigate the role of genetics in the development of cancer recurrence and research to advance early detection of recurrent and secondary cancers using innovative approaches. In addition to fundraising at the event, the V Foundation announced a grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb to fund research focused on cancer survivorship challenges.

Among those attending the event were Amy Robach, News Anchor for ABC’s “Good Morning America;” Deborah Roberts, correspondent for ABC News; Political Consultant Mary Matalin; Political Commentator James Carville; and award-winning actor Christian Hoff.

“Research has led to significant improvements in cancer treatments and more survivors than ever” said George Bodenheimer, V Foundation board member and Not a Moment to Lose campaign chair. “More than 15 million people have survived cancer in the U.S., and through the Robin Roberts Fund for Cancer Survivorship Research, we will be able to focus valuable research dollars toward their unique health challenges.”

Roberts has been a longtime friend and supporter of the V Foundation and was a colleague of Jim Valvano’s at ESPN, prior to joining “Good Morning America.” In 2007, Roberts was diagnosed with breast cancer and faced her diagnosis with courage. Her ensuing battle has been recognized with honors and awards by various organizations throughout the country, including the Dick Vitale Gala in 2016. She inspired so many as she bravely shared her personal battle with the rare blood disorder myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, shortly after breast cancer.

The V Foundation has proudly awarded more than $200 million for cutting-edge cancer research. The V Foundation holds a 4-star (highest) rating from Charity Navigator, America’s largest evaluator of charities, and is among the top 4% of cancer charities of all charities evaluated. The V Foundation is a GuideStar platinum-rated charity.

Visit jimmyv.org/RobinRoberts to contribute to the Robin Roberts Fund for Cancer Survivorship Research.

Charities Win at Tobacco Road Allscripts, GNC Races

Charities Win at Tobacco Road Allscripts, GNC Races

CHARITIES WIN AT CARY’S TOBACCO ROAD MARATHON RACES
Allscripts Tobacco Road Marathon And GNC Half Reach $600,000 in Giving

Cary, NC – The real winners at today’s Allscripts Tobacco Road Marathon and GNC Tobacco Road Half Marathon were the charities supported by Cary’s flourishing community event as $110,000 has been added to a cumulative total now exceeding $600,000 since its founding in 2010. Some 4,000 runners tackled the fast, flat American Tobacco Trail course for a challenge that has grown both in size and national stature as ideal for those wishing to qualify for the elite Boston Marathon. The primary charities supported by the annual contest are: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation JDRF, the Wounded Warrior Project, the American Red Cross and the Rails to Trails Conservancy as well as Wake County Parks and Recreation.

Jason Leonard of Leesburg, Virginia led start to finish in the main event Allscripts marathon as the winner of the men’s competition with a time of two hours, 27 minutes, 45 seconds. Duke University graduate Natalie Kretzer of Charlottesville, Virginia took top honors in the women’s marathon with a personal best time of 2 hours, 59 minutes, 37 seconds. This was the first time either runner has won a marathon, and they picked North Carolina’s largest to get the job done.

The winners of the GNC Half Marathon were Winston Salem’s Christian Thompson, 27, at 1:09.21 in the men’s division and Tara Richardson just 10 minutes behind at 1:19.38 heading up the women’s competition. Richardson, a 24-year-old Wake Forest graduate student, won last year’s Allscripts race.

Higher than normal temperatures and excessive humidity proved a challenge for most runners. Allscripts winner Kretzer grabbed a seat and gulped a bottle of water at the American Red Cross tent just past the finish line. The 28-year-old runner said by the last two miles she was more than ready for the race to be over.

“It was humid, but the course is great,” said Kretzer, 28. “I feel fine, it’s just the weather isn’t what I trained for. We had a lot of snow and ice in Charlottesville until recently. I did a lot of training on the treadmill.”

Leonard, 26, made the point that proper training and staying hydrated was critical. His sentiments were very similar to those expressed by the other winners and leading runners.

“The weather caught up with me a little at the end and this wasn’t my personal best,” Leonard said. “I’m good though. This is a great race. Great course, lots of water stops with Gatorade. Plus, I stayed hydrated all week. I could see this coming.”

Mens’ Allscripts second place finisher Gavin Coombs, who won the marathon in 2010, called the entire weekend a “great event.” Coombs is an assistant manager at the specialty running gear store, Runologie, in Raleigh.

“The course is a little different than in 2010 and it’s a lot better,” Coombs reported. “It’s just such a great local event for the community, so well supported, it’s wonderful to run it again.”

Complete results are available at FS Series. Tobacco Road Marathon President and Founder Kazem Yahyapour pronounced the event a success by every measure.

“The humidity and temperatures were a little higher than we wanted but we can’t control that,” Yahyapour said at the event’s post-race party. “Everything considered we were very fortunate to avoid the rain and thunderstorms that were predicted all week. Our sponsors are delighted as well as our charities. Our board is already looking ahead to the 2017 event.”

The Tobacco Road Marathon Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing financial assistance to charities by channeling the passions of the North Carolina Triangle area’s running community into a powerful force for good.